A Letter from Nantwich

October 2005  

Nothing option is preferable to lost garden

AN OPEN LETTER TO COUNCILLOR ARTHUR MORAN AND HIS LOCAL GOVERNMENT COLLEAGUES   

 

 

This is a photograph I stole from the Nantwich Walled Garden Society. No, not really - I took it to use on their website, along with some photographs of their own. So it's mine to use!

Visit their website to see more.

Councillor Moran,

I am not usually minded to write and express views to local councillors, but after reading your comments in this week's Nantwich Guardian (October 1, 2005), I would like to make the following comment:

    While taking your point about the Nantwich Walled Garden Society having to compromise with the developers or end up with nothing, I would have thought that the "nothing" optional was preferable.

    My point is that the compromise would leave Nantwich with a well-preserved Elizabethan garden wall surrounding a modern apartment block. That is not the same - nowhere near - to the Nantwich Walled Garden Society's desired objective of a flourishing walled garden

   No matter how good architects might consider the building, the apartments would not be a matter of interest to historians.

   A better idea - and this could well be a hidden agenda - would be to demolish the wall and reconstruct a section of it somewhere else in Nantwich. Part of the

 

LET me put my cards on the table and say that at the time of writing this letter, I was the webmaster for the Nantwich Walled Garden Society website.

    It was something I offered to do (and was accepted) and which I did in an unpaid capacity led by their views.

    This website, however, is a different matter. Here I can say what I think - and I am doing so in this letter to Councillor Arthur Moran . . .   


proposed tourist centre on the banks of the River Weaver, perhaps. (See footnote). Far better that than the compromise proposed by councillors.   Nantwich Walled Garden Society see the walled garden as a tourist attraction as well as for locals. How many tourists and local people would want to come to see a block of flats? In any case, I have seen the garden site. It isn't huge (around half an acre). How will anyone get eight flats on it?

 

OF course, as with all things that don't happen straight away, the walled garden idea moved on - but the basic idea stayed the same.

   Restore the walled garden and recreate the scene as it would have been in Elizabethan (the First) days.

 

AS at March 2019 the saga is, amazingly, still

running. I won't take up website space by reiterating the details. See (currently) nine pages to follow the continuing saga. Starting here.

 

FOOTNOTE: What do website visitors think? For more information about the Nantwich Walled Garden Society and its struggle to preserve the Elizabethan walled garden visit their website. Perhaps you would like to express support.

   NWGS. is horrified that there is plan to demolish part of the wall to provide access to eight apartments. That access would be off the roundabout already constructed in this part of Kingsley Village. (See photograph above - and these).

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